>

Sign My GuestBook
FREE GUESTBOOKS
View My GuestBook
home  table
of
contents
FAQ handwriting problems about
Kate
Gladstone
resource
people
 sites books
  World Handwriting Contest
Lefties' Lounge for
Southpaw Scribes
Petition for
Politician Legibility Act
Handwriting Rebels

Font/Color/Background Style Changer customize the font, colors, and style of this site click here for your options!
 

you can turn msic on if you like ...

"DOUBLE" on electronic instruments (Kate's MIDI sequencing of DOUBLE by J. S. Bach)


FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions

Q:
Does handwriting matter in the Computer Age?

A:
For quick notes (phone numbers/names/messages), on-the-spot jottings/memos, short faxes pen/pencil and paper remain the medium of choice. (Just check your fridge door!)

And ... a lot of the info stored in computers or sent over phone lines exists, at some point, only as someone's handwriting (data entry, receptionists' forms, etc).

Even today's computers depend more and more on non-keyboard input such as pen-based input ("electronic ink") and handwriting recognition. (Does your handwriting "compute"? )

top


Q:

I like my personal and unique handwriting. If I "repair" it, won't this mean substituting someone else's "blah", conformist, textbook idea of prissy-perfect "proper penmanship"?

A:

You could never end up writing like any other person (or anyone's "perfect" textbook examples) even if you wanted to!

In writing, as in any other physical skill, we all learn the basics, but - the more we make those basics a part of us - the more our unique selves blaze through.

A child learns to walk (or an injury survivor re-learns) - he or she doesn't worry, "Do I walk individually enough? Or does my walk look the same as anybody else's?"

Yet each of us steps through life with a distinctive, personal walk ... although we each learned to walk "the same as anyone else."

 top 



Go back to handwriting lessons? I hated handwriting practice at school I never could see any point in the ways I was told I "should" make the letters.

A:
Questioning your schooldays' handwriting lessons can mean you have great potential to improve your handwriting ... because some of the most annoying things about typical school-handwriting lessons really do not have much of a point.

(And the people who notice that often do the best with Handwriting Repair .)

Unlike time-wasting conventional approaches, Handwriting Repair eliminates the extra frills and distractions that our handwriting has added over the last 500 years.

or instance: as a child, you probably started out with "print-writing" - then, just when you'd finally gotten the "hang" of all those perfect circles and verticals, your teachers or parents may have forced to change everything and start over, with something very different that they called "cursive writing":

word This ball and stick print writing word This Conventional Cursive

But Handwriting Repair , unlike the conventional methods, won't "jerk you around."

"Hand-friendly" beginnings:

word This hand-friendly

build with almost zero change into a simple mature hand:

word This Italic Cursive

At each stage, you learn speed/legibility techniques to keep handwriting functional in any situation. And you learn better, more frequent use of speed/legibility "shortcuts" that you may have heard were "wrong" - shortcuts you may already have applied without even noticing.

Want something fancier? You can (optionally) let your new skill plus a calligraphy marker or pen create individual variations of calligraphic writing:

word This Italic Cursive using calligraphy
        marker or pen

 top 


Q:
Interesting... but do I want anything "new-&-improved"? ...

... I'd like to stick with "the real thing": traditional cursive writing: the time-honored original. ...

...Where did this come from, anyway? Ergonomics labs? ...

...It looks ... well, ... artistic . Did this get dreamed up in an art studio somewhere?...

...Look: I believe in getting back to basics! ...

A:
Tradition does hold important keys ... and not everything new works well.

Though Handwriting Repair fits the recommendations of recent research involving the ergonomics of our letters, Handwriting Repair also stands solidly on the original traditions of handwriting instruction in our alphabet as this developed through history.
To see how our handwriting developed, click here for a handwriting-history site! (Rome through the Renaissance)'''''''

... to go to that site's scanned sample of Renaissance cursive, click here ...

... or click here to get a cursive-handwriting font replicating the actual handwriting of that Renaissance great, Michelangelo.

... or click here to see handwritten grocery list Michelangelo gave as a shopping list to his assistant

So ...

... What about those loop-and-frill renditions of cursive writing that we like to regard as "the real thing"?

words The real thing looped conventional cursive

They came later: much, much later than the basics I went back to in creating Handwriting Repair .

(In fact, our "time-honored" models of cursive came along later than most major countries.)

And where did loop-and-frill cursives come from, anyway?

From the classroom? From real-world experience?

Well, actually ... they came from ... art studios.

(Want the full, fascinating story?

To learn more, take Handwriting Repair !)
top 

Q:
But ... but ... but I thought signatures always had to be in cursive. Doesn't the law require cursive handwriting for legal signatures?



A:

No legal sources researched by me or by my legal counsel justify the common assumption that signatures require cursive. The following material legally defining signatures and writing comes from definitions in BLACK'S LAW DICTIONARY(eighth edition) and from definitions in the revised Uniform Commercial Code (law in all fifty USA states).

        From the BLACK'S LAW DICTIONARY [ ] entry for "Signature" -

"A signature may be written by hand, printed, stamped,  typewritten, engraved, photographed, or cut from one instrument and  attached to another, and a signature lithographed on an instrument by  a party is sufficient for the purpose of signing it, it being  immaterial with what kind of instrument a signature is made. ... whatever mark, symbol, or device one may choose to employ as a  representative of himself is sufficient ... The name or mark of a  person, written by that person at his or her direction. In commercial  law, any name, word, or mark used with the intention to authenticate a  writing constitutes a signature.  UCC 1-201(39), 3-401(2). A signature  is made by use of any name, including any trade or assumed name, upon  an instrument, or by any word or mark used in lieu of a written  signature."

        From the BLACK'S LAW DICTIONARY definition for "Writing" -

 "The expression of ideas by letters visible to the eye."


      Articles 1-201 (39) and 1-201 (46) of the revised Uniform Commercial  Code :

  (39) "Signed" includes any symbol executed or adopted by a party with present intention to authenticate a writing.

  (46) "Written" or "Writing" includes printing, typewriting, or any other intentional reduction to tangible form.



       Neither source mentions cursive as a requirement for signatures or for handwriting.

top 


Q:
You call this handwriting an "Italic" model. I thought "Italic" meant a font style...?

A:
Yes, the word "Italic" refers to a type-face style ... and it also refers to a handwriting style: the style which inspired many Italic type-fonts of today.

The name "Italic" refers to things from Italy - the style of handwriting called Italic developed in Renaissance Italy in the 15th century, at the same time as the development of book-printing with movable type.

Since paper cost a lot in those early times, printers in Venice, Italy decided to print as legibly as possible on as small an amount of paper as possible - whch meant that they had to use a highly legible, but compact, style of letter.

So, when space and paper-saving were crucial, they copied the most legible and compact handwriting style of the time: Italic handwriting.

Since Italic writing has a very slight slant (in constrast to other traditional handwriting styles that gave us other type-fonts and type-styles), the word "Italic" - in reference to a type-font - came to mean "slanted".

top


Q:
So you've got "the original" ... so what? Does anyone use it TODAY? It somehow doesn't seem ... well, ... American, I guess.

A:
You want "American"? You want "up-to-date"? So do I:

You can't get much more "American" than Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. Pilgrim fathers William Bradford and Elder William Brewster learned relatively frill-free Italic handwritings in their youth, and brought these handwritings to the New World on the MAYFLOWER. Even today - even though spelling and much else has changed since Pilgrim times, we still find these Pilgrim Fathers' handwritings much simpler and more legible than most American handwritings of later centuries.

To see and read manuscripts in William Bradford's original handwriting, visit the "living history" museum of the Plymouth Colony: "Plimoth Plantation" in Plymouth, Massachusetts or click the following links to see ...

Click here to see the Mayflower Compact in William Bradford's handwriting.

(I would like to link to scans of Elder William Brewster's handwriting, but I haven't yet found any scans of his writing on-line. If you know of a site with samples of Elder Brewster's handwriting, please inform me!)

Even in Pilgrim times, though, most schools imposed more fanciful styles - as they have continued to do in the centuries since. However, no matter what ornamentation a given teacher or textbook prescribed, many Americans (famous and otherwise) have always simplified their writing, improving on the school methods of their day.

For instance, the loop-de-loop gorgeousness of the Declaration of Independence<
(click here to visit it on a historical-documents site)

does not show Jefferson's actual writing: eighteenth-century professional penman Timothy Matlack, not Jefferson, created that famous finished copy.

>Jefferson's own writing uses a slight, almost vertical slant, with simple capitals and few loops:

much like Handwriting Repair writing.


Click here to see page 1 of Jefferson's handwritten draft of the Declaration of Independence.

Click here to see page 2 of Jefferson's handwritten draft of the Declaration of Independence.

Click here to see page 3 of Jefferson's handwritten draft of the Declaration of Independence.

Click here to see page 4 of Jefferson's handwritten draft of the Declaration of Independence.

Here is a page that show the history of handwriting and graphic art showing the importance of  italic but not a mention of cursive.

top 


Q:
What about TODAY ?

A:
You probably know at least a few people who handwrite with unusual clarity even at the highest speeds.

Take a good, careful look at how they write!
(When you do, you probably won't find anything even close to typical classroom/workbook models of "how to make the letters.")

word this in Italic Cursive not word this in conventional
        cursive

Those "natural" handwriters have (more often than not) unconsciously happened on many Handwriting Repair forms and techniques.

On their own - perhaps without even knowing it - they have discovered something that makes sense. They write well, in spite of everything, pretty much "by accident."
Background on our handwriting, past and present:

3 videos, by a colleague, show why cursive is NOT a sacrament:
A BRIEF HISTORY OF CURSIVE —
TIPS TO FIX HANDWRITING —
HANDWRITING AND MOTOR MEMORY
(shows how fine motor skills are developed in handwriting without conventional cursive) —
http://youtu.be/Od7PGzEHbu0

With Handwriting Repair,

competence does not require an accident.

With Handwriting Repair,

all of us can share success.


Google
Web YOUR DOMAIN NAME

>

Sign My GuestBook
FREE GUESTBOOKS
View My GuestBook
home  table
of
contents
FAQ handwriting problems about
Kate
Gladstone
resource
people
 sites books
  World Handwriting Contest
Lefties' Lounge  for
Southpaw Scribes
Petition for
Politician Legibility Act
Home of the
Handwriting Rebels

Font/Color/Background Style Changer customize the font, colors, and style of this site click here for your options!
 

Kate Gladstone -

The Handwriting Repairwoman

165 N. Allen Street

First Floor

Albany, NY 12206 USA

telephone: 1 518 482 6763

e-mail: handwritingrepair@gmail.com



Original Text: